Using Kidblog to Teach (and be taught)

 KidblogStudent

 

As a STEM teacher, I am always reminding myself to ‘let go’ and give students more ownership of their learning. To help with this practice, I offered students a chance to apply for a ‘Blogging Assistant’ job with me. Two students chose to apply, submit letters of reference and were interviewed by two other staff members. They were both offered the job! As a part of their job description, they will help create new ideas of ways we can use blogging in our STEM classroom. One of my ‘Assistant Bloggers’, Cora, explains how she helped teach a STEM lesson to her peers using Kidblog. After watching her teach, I am more knowledgeable about Kidblog, learned more about her, and discovered areas I could improve my own teaching.  Enjoy her writing!

“I am teaching my fifth-hour class how to upload images into Kidblog. First, my STEM teacher, Mr. Boerman, introduced me to the class and told them what I was going to do, then he let me take the lead. I explained what I was going to do and then started with the “How to” part. I first clicked on “Upload” and then clicked on “Take Picture”. I couldn’t see if I was taking a picture so when I clicked “Capture” it sent me back to “Media Library” and the photo showed up. Once the image showed up Mr. Boerman ended up saying it was scary. I believe he said it was scary because part of my face just popped up. I honestly thought it was kind of embarrassing to have half of the class start to laugh at me and also have Mr. Boerman think it was scary. Second, I showed my class how to upload photos from Google Drive. I clicked on the google drive logo and logged in as Mr. Boerman. I then looked up “picture”. I clicked on one of the images that came up and inserted it into the blog post. Since that was the last thing, I stopped teaching and we started cleaning up to go to our next class.

I also taught my fifth hour STEM class how to upload photos into Kidblog because we are creating satellites and we’re making a blog about our satellite. Before anyone starts the blog they have to have their satellite design done and have the satellite physically made. We also have to have our drop testing done. Our drop test has some requirements: first, we must drop our satellite from one meter. Second, we must drop the satellite from two different sides: upright and sideways. Third, we must take a photo after each drop test. Once all of that is done we can start working on our blog. Our blog must consist of: describing our satellite before the drop test, describing our satellite after the drop test (did anything fall off?), describing the next steps to improve (get ideas from other teams in STEM to improve), and our blog must have our images imported in.”

If you’re looking for more student opinions on blogging, take a listen to our Dual language blogging podcast here, or check out Bill’s additional STEM articles on our blog.

About the Author
Bill has spent the past 20 years teaching in England, Michigan, and Colorado. He has taught in 1st through 6th grades and is currently teaching STEM to 6th graders at Holland Public Schools. He has a Masters in Integrated Natural Sciences from Colorado College and is Nationally Board Certified in Early Adolescent Mathematics.

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